David Gelb’s Jiro Dreams of Sushi

Jiro Ono wakes at 4am – the hour of death – to meditate on the death of his monster. The greatest reverence a man can show to his monster is to eat the monster raw.

Jiro Ono takes a bath and scrubs any vulgar or false odor from his body. In his mind he removes the bones from his skeleton and scrubs each one in milk. When he is profoundly pure he gets out of the bath and stands naked beside an open window. Children passing on their way to school say, “The Master is drying.”

Jiro Ono eats eight raw oysters for breakfast. All night he dreamed of them sleeping in the refrigerator in their salt brine. All night they dreamed of Jiro Ono’s tongue.

Jiro Ono flaps to the subway station on a pair of wooden wings and flippers. As he touches down before the terminal the angels kneel and kiss the ground.

Jiro Ono speaks to the tuna – god of the sea – and touches his forehead to Its forehead. He says, “Here I thought I was teaching you to be a tuna. But really you were teaching me to be a man.”

Yoshikazu Ono makes sushi for six hours. At the end of six hours he takes all the sushi he made and throws it away. Then he wakes and makes sushi for twelve hours.

Neither Jiro Ono nor Yoshikazu Ono were born of WOMAN. There are no women in this film. But if there were their portions would be smaller. The Onos were born like Venus, swaddled in sea kelp, suckled in sea foam.

Jiro Ono eats the monster raw. From the moment the monster died until the moment it touched his lips there were minimal changes. Perhaps six hours. Perhaps six minutes separates them from being THE SAME ANIMAL. It is safe to say the monster nearly lived inside Jiro Ono.

Jiro Ono takes the day’s earnings. If ten people ate sushi that day it is 300,000 yen. He constructs a paper boat with the head of a swan. He sails the boat back home. Then he burns the boat.

Jiro Dreams of Sushi . . . $13

 

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Babies

BABIES!!!  who doesn’t love babies?  Obviously everyone loves babies.  So pretty smart move focusing on just babies and nothing else.   Thomas Balmes takes us to four different countries to follow the first year of four incredibly cute babies Bayar, Hattie, Mari, and Ponijao.  Bayar is the only boy of the bunch.  There are a few interesting things to note about babies through this study, 1) that although the babies are really small, can’t talk to really gesture, you can see how different their personalities are, and you can actually like (or like not as much) one baby over another.  and yes, I compared, and yes, I came out with favorites; 2) how much the babies adopted what they saw around them as things they would do themselves; and 3) how similar and how different each one of them was based on their environment.  Nothing ground-breakingly new, but still is interesting to view these development of the brand new humans first hand, in an accelerated journey through their first year of life.

I also found myself worried over the safety of some of the babies, but they all turned out fine!  When Bayar looked like he was about to get crushed by a horse‘s hoof, the horse evaded him and he crawled through the horses legs, happy as a plum.

This is a movie focuses on the adorable-ness of the protagonists, but in the context of  the lush scenary and beautiful backgrounds of BayanchandmaniMongolia (Bayar), OpuwaNamibia (Ponijao), San Francisco, US (Hattie), and Japan, Tokyo (Mari).  Best of all, this is currently available on streaming at netflix, if you have a subscription.  An enjoyable film with minimal dialog but plenty of ooh-ing and ahhh-ing…$8

If you heart Babies:

Recommendations from …:

Mad Hot Ballroom
Hero (visually beautiful)
March of the Penguins

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